GATELESS GATE KOAN PDF

Zen has no gates. Therefore Zen should be gateless. Now, how does one pass through this gateless gate? Some say that whatever enters through a gate is not family treasure, that whatever is produced by the help of another is likely to dissolve and perish. Even such words are like raising waves in a windless sea or performing an operation upon a healthy body.

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Wumen selected the 48 koans and commented on and added a verse for each koan. His teachings were transcribed and after the training period were compiled into the collection called the Wumen Guan. As was customary in China at the time, an edition might have additions of text inserted by a subsequent owner or publisher. The most well known version of the text is from the Japanese wood block edition made from the manuscript edition that contains the following sections.

An untitled dedication by Wumen to the Emperor and Empress. Works without such dedications were subject to Imperial censorship as being seditious.

An untitled foreword by Wumen followed by a verse on the title. A table of contents with the title of each koan. An untitled afterword by Wumen that ends with the words "The end of the volume the Gateless Checkpoint. For example, Zen is known as the school of Buddhism that does not stand on written words and one caveat says, "Neglecting the written records with unrestrained ideas is falling into a deep pit.

Huanglong Huinan J. Oryo Enan , What is your cause of birth? A short untitled addendum by Wuan written on the republishing of the work in the summer of C. Wuan called his brief addition the 49th case. This appears to be a metaphor for the practice of Zen. Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope. Moving freely vertically and horizontally without obstruction is the way of outsiders and the nightmare army. To preserve the heart mind and to purify it by letting impurities settle to the bottom in quiescence is the perverted Zen of silent illumination.

Neglecting the written records with unrestrained ideas is falling into a deep pit. To be awake and not ignorant is to wear chains and shoulder a cangue. Thinking good and thinking evil are the halls of heaven and hell. A view of Buddha and a view of Dharma are the two enclosing mountains of iron. A person who perceives thoughts as they immediately arise is fiddling with spectral consciousness. However, being on a high plateau practicing samadhi is the stratagem of living in the house of ghosts.

To advance results in ignoring truth; to retreat results in contradicting the lineage. Neither to advance nor to retreat is being a breathing corpse. Just say, how will you walk? You must work hard to live in the present and, to finish, all the more. I do not advise the unfortunate excess of continual suffering.

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The Gateless Gate: The Classic Book of Zen Koans

Obscures the clarity. If he answers, he will lose his life. What should he do? Even if you can explain the whole body of the Buddhist sutras, that is also useless. If you can answer the problem properly, you can kill the living, bring the dead back to life.

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Wild fox koan

Wumen selected the 48 koans and commented on and added a verse for each koan. His teachings were transcribed and after the training period were compiled into the collection called the Wumen Guan. As was customary in China at the time, an edition might have additions of text inserted by a subsequent owner or publisher. The most well known version of the text is from the Japanese wood block edition made from the manuscript edition that contains the following sections. An untitled dedication by Wumen to the Emperor and Empress.

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The Gateless Gate

Overview[ edit ] The koan tells the story of a monk who, after denying that an enlightened person falls into cause and effect, was turned into a wild fox for five hundred lifetimes. Huangbo steps forward and slaps Baizhang, ostensibly in the awareness that Baizhang had intended to strike him. Baizhang laughs approvingly and compares Huangbo to the Indian monk and Zen patriarch Bodhidharma. Main case[ edit ] Tanahashi gives the following rendering of the koan: [1] Every time Baizhang, Zen Master Dahui, gave a dharma talk, a certain old man would come to listen.

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